Committed to the continued growth of wind energy
Featured Reports

American Wind Energy Association. U.S. Wind Industry Market Reports
Learn about the current status of the U.S. wind industry, including statistics and comparisons to past years.

Chapman, S.; St. George, A.; Waller, K; Cakic, V. (March 14, 2013). Spatio-Temporal Differences in the History of Health and Noise Complaints about Australian Wind Farms: Evidence for the Psychogenic, “Communicated Disease” Hypothesis. University of Sydney.
The study provided powerful evidence for the nocebo hypothesis (the idea that anxiety and fear about wind turbines being spread by anti-wind groups will cause some people to get those symptoms).

Crichton, F.; Dodd, G.; Schmid, G.; Gamble, G.; Petrie, K.J. (March 11, 2013). Can Expectations Produce Symptoms from Infrasound Associated with Wind Turbines? American Psychological Association.
Conclusions: "Healthy volunteers, when given information about the expected physiological effect of infrasound, reported symptoms that aligned with that information, during exposure to both infrasound and sham infrasound. Symptom expectations were created by viewing information readily available on the Internet, indicating the potential for symptom expectations to be created outside of the laboratory, in real world settings. Results suggest psychological expectations could explain the link between wind turbine exposure and health complaints."

International Finance Corporation/World Bank Group. (2007). Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines for Wind Energy (PDF 527 KB)
The Environmental, Health, and Safety Guidelines are technical reference documents with general and industry-specific examples of Good International Industry Practice.

Merlin, T.; Newton, S.; Ellery, B.; Milverton, J.; Farah, C. (2013). Systematic Review of the Human Health Effects of Wind Farms. National Health and Medical Research Council, Canberra.
A draft report by Australia's leading expert health research body debunks the myths surrounding wind development and its effect on human health.

National Academy of Sciences. (2009). Hidden Costs of Energy: Unpriced Consequences of Energy Production and Use
A new report from the National Research Council examines "hidden" costs of energy production and use -- such as the damage air pollution imposes on human health -- that are not reflected in market prices of coal, oil, other energy sources, or the electricity and gasoline produced from them.

National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2005). Model State Implementation Plan Documentation for Wind Energy Purchase in State with Renewable Energy Set-Aside (PDF 520 KB)
Wind energy can displace electric generation from coal-, oil-, and natural-gas-fired plants, thereby reducing conventional air pollutants as well as greenhouse gas emissions (e.g., carbon dioxide). New wind energy plants can play an important role in reducing air emissions and spurring a transition from fossil fuel-fired plants to emission-free wind energy. This model documentation is designed to assist state and local governments in pursuing wind energy purchases as a control measure under regional air quality plans.

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). 20% Wind Energy by 2030
This groundbreaking report examines one scenario for reaching 20% wind energy by 2030 and contrasts it to a scenario of no new U.S. wind power capacity. One section of the report discusses reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.

More Information

American Wind Energy Association. (2010). Wind Turbines and Health (PDF 136 KB)
This fact sheet discusses air quality, sound, and shadow flicker.

Kempton, W. & Levy, J. Harvard School of Public Health. (2007). Letter to Delaware Public Service Commission (PDF 167 KB)
This document summarizes an evaluation of the health benefits of 600 MW of new wind generation in Delaware.

Renewable Energy Research Laboratory, University of Massachusetts at Amherst. (2006). Wind Turbine Noise, Infrasound, and Noise Perception (PDF 2.3 MB)
This presentation covers terminology, wind turbine noise, predicting noise at a wind turbine site, noise regulations, infrasound, and perception of noise.

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008).Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Arizona (PDF 502 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008).Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Arkansas (PDF 542 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008).Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Georgia (PDF 497 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2009). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Idaho (PDF 479 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Indiana (PDF 491 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Kansas (PDF 534 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Maine (PDF 455 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Maryland (PDF 529 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2009). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Massachusetts (PDF 615 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Michigan (PDF 504 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Montana (PDF 538 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Nebraska (PDF 520 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Nevada (PDF 479 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008).Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in New Mexico (PDF 499 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in New York (PDF 480 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2009). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in North Carolina (PDF 625 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Ohio (PDF 505 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Pennsylvania (PDF 501 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in South Dakota (PDF 510 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2009). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Tennessee (PDF 601 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Utah (PDF 478 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Virginia (PDF 533 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in West Virginia (PDF 466 KB)

U.S. Department of Energy. (2008). Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts of New Wind Power in Wisconsin (PDF 423 KB)

U.S. News and World Report. (2008). 10 Ways Global Warming Could Hurt Your Health.
Scientists have observed changes that are impacting individuals' health and have also created models to predict where we might be headed. This article provides a sampling of what's ahead.